méme brûlée

7 hours ago · 15,500 notes · Source · Reblogged from calgreenery

When someone works for less pay than she can live on — when, for example, she goes hungry so that you can eat more cheaply and conveniently — then she has made a great sacrifice for you, she has made you a gift of some part of her abilities, her health, and her life. The ‘working poor,’ as they are approvingly termed, are in fact the major philanthropists of our society. They neglect their own children so that the children of others will be cared for; they live in substandard housing so that other homes will be shiny and perfect; they endure privation so that inflation will be low and stock prices high. To be a member of the working poor is to be an anonymous donor, a nameless benefactor, to everyone else.
—  Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. (via howtobeterrell)

7 hours ago · 4,652 notes · Source · Reblogged from yoursocialconstructsareshowing

When someone works for less pay than she can live on — when, for example, she goes hungry so that you can eat more cheaply and conveniently — then she has made a great sacrifice for you, she has made you a gift of some part of her abilities, her health, and her life. The ‘working poor,’ as they are approvingly termed, are in fact the major philanthropists of our society. They neglect their own children so that the children of others will be cared for; they live in substandard housing so that other homes will be shiny and perfect; they endure privation so that inflation will be low and stock prices high. To be a member of the working poor is to be an anonymous donor, a nameless benefactor, to everyone else.
—  Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. (via howtobeterrell)

7 hours ago · 4,652 notes · Source · Reblogged from yoursocialconstructsareshowing

WOULD ANY SANE PERSON think dumpster diving would have stopped Hitler, or that composting would have ended slavery or brought about the eight-hour workday, or that chopping wood and carrying water would have gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or that dancing naked around a fire would have helped put in place the Voting Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the world at stake, do so many people retreat into these entirely personal “solutions”?

Part of the problem is that we’ve been victims of a campaign of systematic misdirection. Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organized political resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped raise consciousness about global warming. But did you notice that all of the solutions presented had to do with personal consumption—changing light bulbs, inflating tires, driving half as much—and had nothing to do with shifting power away from corporations, or stopping the growth economy that is destroying the planet? Even if every person in the United States did everything the movie suggested, U.S. carbon emissions would fall by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus is that emissions must be reduced by at least 75 percent worldwide.

Or let’s talk water. We so often hear that the world is running out of water. People are dying from lack of water. Rivers are dewatered from lack of water. Because of this we need to take shorter showers. See the disconnect? Because I take showers, I’m responsible for drawing down aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent of the water used by humans is used by agriculture and industry. The remaining 10 percent is split between municipalities and actual living breathing individual humans. Collectively, municipal golf courses use as much water as municipal human beings. People (both human people and fish people) aren’t dying because the world is running out of water. They’re dying because the water is being stolen.

…Personal change doesn’t equal social change.

17 hours ago · 21,579 notes · Source · Reblogged from nowthatisafancydan

17 hours ago · 15,497 notes · Source · Reblogged from twitchytwitchtwitch

Stigma never put its hands around my throat and tried to strangle me. It’s men who buy sex who do that. Stop shifting the blame.
—  Rachel Moran, prostitution survivor and author of “Paid For” (via espanties)

17 hours ago · 367 notes · Source · Reblogged from anoukc

skeetshoot:

geogallery:

Perowskite 
Rother Kopf Mountain, near the the community of Roth in the town of Gerolstein, also in Rheinland-Palatinate’s span of the Eifel Mountains. (Photo: Fred Kruijen)

crystal fern, my beautiful daughter

skeetshoot:

geogallery:

Perowskite 

Rother Kopf Mountain, near the the community of Roth in the town of Gerolstein, also in Rheinland-Palatinate’s span of the Eifel Mountains. (Photo: Fred Kruijen)

crystal fern, my beautiful daughter

1 day ago · 1,344 notes · Source · Reblogged from pipistrellus

These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

1 day ago · 49,750 notes · Source · Reblogged from yoursocialconstructsareshowing

Anonymous asked: “what drugs have you done”

h0odrich:

nice try mom

1 day ago · 95,952 notes · Source · Reblogged from whoreizon-wireless

irontemple:

oh godddd

irontemple:

oh godddd

1 day ago · 10,670 notes · Source · Reblogged from whoreizon-wireless

spookasaur:

IM LAUGJING SO HARD the picture looks so sleek and professional with the lighting but ITS A SPOOKY DOGE

spookasaur:

IM LAUGJING SO HARD the picture looks so sleek and professional with the lighting but ITS A SPOOKY DOGE

1 day ago · 342,185 notes · Source · Reblogged from whoreizon-wireless

indikos:

burned my hand curling my hair today

worth it

1 day ago · 180,127 notes · Source · Reblogged from whoreizon-wireless

hokeyfright:

the only true ally

hokeyfright:

the only true ally

1 day ago · 93,564 notes · Source · Reblogged from whoreizon-wireless

1 day ago · 198 notes · Reblogged from jose-maria-palma95

The greatest risk to man is not that he aims too high and misses, but that he aims too low and hits.
—  Michaelangelo (via observando)

1 day ago · 691 notes · Source · Reblogged from art-sci